See Now in Paris: Artists of the Roaring Twenties

 
See Now in Paris: Artists of the Roaring Twenties

Long marginalised and discriminated against, women artists of the first half of the 20th century nevertheless played an essential role in the development of the great artistic movements, without being recognised for such during their lifetime. The Musée du Luxembourg in Paris invites us to restore these pioneers to their rightful place in the history of art – from Fauvism to Abstraction, through Cubism, Dadaism and Surrealism in particular – but also in the world of architecture, dance, design, literature, fashion and science.

The exhibition bears witness to the boldness and courage of these women in the face of established convention. The 1920s was a period of cultural effervescence, giving birth to its nickname “The Roaring Twenties”. Along with parties, exuberance and strong economic growth, it was also a time of questioning gender roles, and artists of the era gave shape to this revolution in identity… that is until the rise of populism, the global economic crash and the Second World War once again restricted their visibility. This exhibition revisits this shining moment during Les Années Folles.

Romaine Brooks, Au bord de la mer (détail), 105 x 68 cm, 1923, huile sur toile, Musée franco-américain du château de Blérancourt

Romaine Brooks, Au bord de la mer (détail), 105 x 68 cm, 1923, huile sur toile, Musée franco-américain du château de Blérancourt © Droits réservés photo Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. Rmn-Grand Palais Gérard

The museum is open every day from 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., with late closings on Monday evening at 10 p.m. 19h.
The exhibit will run until July 10, 2022 and the full-price ticket is 13 euros.
www.museeduluxembourg.fr

From France Today magazine

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Lead photo credit : Pionnieres poster, Musée du Luxembourg website

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Sylvia Edwards Davis is a writer and correspondent based in France with a focus on business and culture. A member of the France Media editorial team, Sylvia scans the cultural landscape to bring you the most relevant highlights on current events, art exhibitions, museums and festivals.